Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Tomahawk wrote:
Ben wrote:
Teague wrote:

Science in action.

Is it? Was the sample size large enough for this to be considered statistically relevant?


I have Saniss' phone number. I called him. He didn't answer "Ahoy hoy".

That's about as statistically relevant as it gets.

God loves you!

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52

Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Tomahawk wrote:
Ben wrote:
Teague wrote:

Science in action.

Is it? Was the sample size large enough for this to be considered statistically relevant?


I have Saniss' phone number. I called him. He didn't answer "Ahoy hoy".

That's about as statistically relevant as it gets.

I mean, I work for a company that makes SIP telephony software. I could program it to call him 6 times a minute for... say... 100,000 calls? I'll classify it as a load-test smile

Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

FUCK YEAH I LOVE THIS PLAN LOAD-TEST SANISS'S MOM




(Apologies to Saniss's mom.)

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Metallica's Master of Puppets has a recurrent riff that doesn't perfectly correspond to any kind of time signature; the band just plays it by feel.

Did you ever feel like something was off in that song's rhythm? I didn't. The measure feels right and is performed correctly in unison by the whole band, but though it's often transcribed as a 5/8 measure, it's not exactly the case. There's an added pause that permanently shifts the beat onwards.

I personally love that this beat is incorrect from a technical point of view, but the song still feels perfectly right. Something about the instinctive nature of music that can't be narrowed down to technical terms.

Last edited by Saniss (2018-10-18 22:01:07)

Sébastien Fraud
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"We're gonna build a great green screen, and make the traditional matte painters pay for it"
Saniss for President 2016 - "Make VFX great again"

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Well I enjoyed the shit out of that.

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Saniss wrote:

Metallica's Master of Puppets has a recurrent riff that doesn't perfectly correspond to any kind of time signature; the band just plays it by feel.

Did you ever feel like something was off in that song's rhythm? I didn't. The measure feels right and is performed correctly in unison by the whole band, but though it's often transcribed as a 5/8 measure, it's not exactly the case. There's an added pause that permanently shifts the beat onwards.

I personally love that this beat is incorrect from a technical point of view, but the song still feels perfectly right. Something about the instinctive nature of music that can't be narrowed down to technical terms.

This is why music and musicians blow my mind.

God loves you!

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Shamelessly stealing from my front page of reddit, but damn this is cool.

There has only ever been one underwater submarine to underwater submarine battle ever. In 1945, between the German U-Boat U-864 and the British HMS Venturer just outside Bergen, Norway.

https://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-b … ever-23253

ZangrethorDigital.ca

Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Saniss wrote:

Metallica's Master of Puppets has a recurrent riff that doesn't perfectly correspond to any kind of time signature; the band just plays it by feel.

Did you ever feel like something was off in that song's rhythm? I didn't. The measure feels right and is performed correctly in unison by the whole band, but though it's often transcribed as a 5/8 measure, it's not exactly the case. There's an added pause that permanently shifts the beat onwards.

I personally love that this beat is incorrect from a technical point of view, but the song still feels perfectly right. Something about the instinctive nature of music that can't be narrowed down to technical terms.

I subscribed to that guy after you pointed this out in chat many moons ago. It's good stuff.

Hurroo

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

This channel is incredible. Lots of music theory and knowledge derived from popular music works, clear explanations coated in a bit of humor (the Lars Ulrich Disdainful Face in the video above killed me).

I may have linked to it in the Youtube recommandation thread a while ago... Probably got lost in the offering of the database to the Gods beyond.

Sébastien Fraud
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"We're gonna build a great green screen, and make the traditional matte painters pay for it"
Saniss for President 2016 - "Make VFX great again"

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

That guy also has the best description of modes I've ever found.

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

The first direct commercial purchase in internet history was a dude purchasing an album by Sting.

In 1994.

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Tropical cyclones don't exist near the equator.


https://eoimages.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/imagerecords/7000/7079/tropical_cyclone_map_lrg.gif

Cyclones can only exist because of the Coriolis effect (among other factors like sea temperature, tropopause altitude, etc.): because Earth is a rotating sphere, air will not travel around it at the same speed depending on its latitude (same as us). Thus when such air moves up or down in latitude, its speed will remain unchanged but will now be different from everything else around it, and shift to the east or the west in comparison to the Earth.

That effect will naturally reverse its direction at the equator, as rotation speed has reached its maximum and will start to decrease.

https://thumbor.forbes.com/thumbor/960x0/https%3A%2F%2Fblogs-images.forbes.com%2Fmarshallshepherd%2Ffiles%2F2018%2F06%2FSlide1-2.jpg

The Coriolis effect (which is, by the way, a pseudo force, because it doesn't exist per se but is only a result of inertial laws) is well-known, but it took me a while to be able to visualize it correctly.

Last edited by Saniss (2018-10-21 14:13:12)

Sébastien Fraud
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"We're gonna build a great green screen, and make the traditional matte painters pay for it"
Saniss for President 2016 - "Make VFX great again"

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Fuck yeah. Every minute I spent Actually Figuring Out The Coriolis Effect was worth it tenfold.

It's one of those 'cheat-code' bits of knowledge that unlocks a lot of insights in adjacent fields.

---

To nobody: For what it's worth, the reason the sky is such an elusive pain in the ass to figure out is because even the simplest models are three-dimensional: it's temperature — and pressure — and humidity. All three affect the other two, but if you had to pick one to play the role of 'main driver,' it'd probably ultimately be temperature — because, while pressure matters most, temperature is an antecedent to pressure. (Heat = excited, fiercely mosh-pitting molecules; more-heat = molecules mosh-pit more fiercely, thus 'pressing' against each other more, thus all molecules 'expand' their mosh-pits; expanding mosh-pits = higher pressure.) That said, they really do all affect each other, which is what makes 'trying to model the sky you're looking at' such a tricky, rewarding hobby.

And don't get me started on clouds.

(Oh, and mushroom clouds! That's all the result of a heat ball, 100% of the rest is default atmospheric behavior.)

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Temperature is also an antecedent to humidity, since warm water allows more evaporation (molecules mosh-pitting at the surface of water manage to escape it better than molecules not mosh-pitting) and warm air can contain more water vapor.

It's precisely what is happening to us at the moment in southern France: the Mediterranean sea is warm from the summer months, That's a powerful-ass fuel. Get in there warm air from the Atlantic, another mass of air coming from the opposite direction (creating a vertical force much like two meeting huge pieces of land created the Alps) and you got yourself huge rainstorms that last for days and create flash floods.

Temperature is the antecedent to everything. The only reason we have climate in the first place is because our pale blue dot is round and doesn't get as much sunlight at the poles than it does at the equator. It's the basis to everything.

Last edited by Saniss (2018-10-21 22:13:12)

Sébastien Fraud
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"We're gonna build a great green screen, and make the traditional matte painters pay for it"
Saniss for President 2016 - "Make VFX great again"

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

I think it got lost in the explosion, but someone posted that video a while back of new fluid sim techniques to try and understand tornadoes, and right now the general consensus is..... *non-committal confused shrug*.

ZangrethorDigital.ca

Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Saniss wrote:

Temperature is also an antecedent to humidity, since warm water allows more evaporation (molecules mosh-pitting at the surface of water manage to escape it better than molecules not mosh-pitting) and warm air can contain more water vapor.

Yo, I totally hadn't gotten there yet. You just taught me that piece of the world. Thanks. smile

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

I suggest any fans of little factoids seekout a podcast called "No Such Thing As A Fish". It's by the team that research and write QI and it's basically this thread in podcast form.

Extended Edition - 141 Doctor Who, Medicine Woman
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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Thanks, mate.

...

(Did I pull that off?)

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Teague wrote:

Yo, I totally hadn't gotten there yet. You just taught me that piece of the world. Thanks. smile

Being a huge storm nerd finally pays off!

I'd be glad to continue this in a dedicated thread. Meteorology is great.

Sébastien Fraud
Facebook | Twitter | 500px
"We're gonna build a great green screen, and make the traditional matte painters pay for it"
Saniss for President 2016 - "Make VFX great again"

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Saniss wrote:
Teague wrote:

Yo, I totally hadn't gotten there yet. You just taught me that piece of the world. Thanks. smile

Being a huge storm nerd finally pays off!

I'd be glad to continue this in a dedicated thread. Meteorology is great.

I second this motion. Start with ball lightning.

God loves you!

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Upon seeing the darkside of the moon, the Apollo 8 Astronaughts almost radio'd back the sighting of a large black monolith in reference to 2001.

According to Arthur C. Clarke in the forward to the copy of novel I'm currently reading.

Extended Edition - 141 Doctor Who, Medicine Woman
VFX Reel | Twitter | IMDB | Blog

Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

"Sistren" is a word, as the feminine form of the word "Brethren"

"Ye" is an old pronoun (in the age of Thou, Thee, Thine, etc.) that is the plural 2nd person form of "You"

Witness me!

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

http://www.pinkfive.com/images/post/kliban.jpg

Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

The Universal back lot has had major set destroying fires in 1957, 1967, 1987, 1997 and 2008

The sequence was starting to look a little fishy...

Hurroo

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Re: The Little-Known Factoids Thread

Was? Hey man, we've still got a whole year-and-one-month for a new fire to play into the established precedent!

*dons bookie cap*

Hollywood insurance fires! Place your bets!

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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