Topic: Sup?

So... what have you been doin' with yourself lately?

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: Sup?

Oh you know, the usual: unemployed, job hunting, visual effects taking longer to finish than I want, stressed, depression, the general inability to even.

ZangrethorDigital.ca
youtube.com/bigdamnartist

Re: Sup?

Went to my sister's wedding at the weekend at Loch Lomond and it was a great day, the weather was gorgeous for the outside ceremony. Still unemployed but I'm not worried, I'll find something. Also, still plugging away at my podcast and having fun with it.

Sup with you, Teague?

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Re: Sup?

also unemployed, but in a good way. Relocated hemispheres (N for S, W for E), now in Van Dieman's Land far away from the London IMAX>

And just like that...

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Re: Sup?

Being anxious about work, getting deeper into jazz, reading lots. Just saw 2001 in 70mm tonight, which was bloody gorgeous.

Re: Sup?

Lost both my cat and my uncle in May, so I'm trying to get back to normal, which means getting back to doing music for BDA's short.

The Wobbling Warrior

Re: Sup?

Got a nice raise yesterday, work is going great. Bought a townhouse back in November, just starting to feel settled in. Doing physical therapy to fix my stubborn hamstring and shoulder. Watching GLOW season 2. Still lurking on this forum from time to time tongue

Last edited by Sam F (2018-07-05 03:30:16)

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Re: Sup?

New job is going well, worked yesterday on the 4th which was different as of late. Came in and they had a Pandora station of Souza going; I could listen to marches all day but some grumps changed it halfway through.

Also posting a video shortly that I'll make a separate thread for over in Creations.

Boter, formerly of TF.N as Boter and DarthArjuna. I like making movies and playing games, in one order or another.

Re: Sup?

21st wedding anniversary today, big-family cousin's wedding this weekend. Procrastinating: the lawn, vehicle maintenance and my annual multi-cam dance recital edit.

[edit: clarify that the bride and groom are properly unrelated.]

Last edited by drewjmore (2018-07-05 16:15:11)

(UTC-06:00) Central Time (US & Canada)

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Re: Sup?

Works for the postal service. Need I say more?

Hurroo

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Re: Sup?

Fighting depression, working, working some more, gaming, and trying to find a girlfriend.

Yeah, apart from the job thing, I'm pretty much 13.

Tomahawk Ellingsen

www.extendededition.net

Re: Sup?

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BigDamnArtist wrote:

Oh you know, the usual: unemployed, job hunting, visual effects taking longer to finish than I want, stressed, depression, the general inability to even.

This unemployed man is kerfuffled.

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Jimmy B wrote:

Went to my sister's wedding at the weekend at Loch Lomond and it was a great day, the weather was gorgeous for the outside ceremony. Still unemployed but I'm not worried, I'll find something. Also, still plugging away at my podcast and having fun with it.

Sup with you, Teague?

This unemployed man is not kerfuffled.

Oh, you know. Hangin' out with Cloe, readin' books and shit; hatching bizarre schemes to escape the rat race.

(Or, in other words: I'm unemployed.)

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avatar wrote:

also unemployed, but in a good way.

YO CAN WE GET AN EMPLOYED PERSON IN HERE GATDAMN

avatar wrote:

also unemployed, but in a good way. Relocated hemispheres (N for S, W for E), now in Van Dieman's Land far away from the London IMAX>

You moved to Tasmania?

1) That's awesome. 2) Can I ask why? 3) Are the animals scary? 4) Do y'all and New Zealand have stick fights?

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DarthPraxus wrote:

Being anxious about work

oh thank god he's employed

DarthPraxus wrote:

Being anxious about work, getting deeper into jazz, reading lots. Just saw 2001 in 70mm tonight, which was bloody gorgeous.

1) 2001 in 70mm sounds lovely. 2) Tell me of your jazz journey thus far. ('cuz I'm basically nowhere on jazz.)

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KyleMonroe wrote:

Lost both my cat and my uncle in May, so I'm trying to get back to normal, which means getting back to doing music for BDA's short.

Well, I've been glad to see ya poppin' back in from time to time. big_smile Sorry about your family members, though.

What's been your process on the score so far? Sounds, instrumentation, pipeline, etc.. What's the plan?

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Sam F wrote:

Got a nice raise yesterday, work is going great.


https://i.imgur.com/BluXeOa.png


Sam F wrote:

Got a nice raise yesterday, work is going great. Bought a townhouse back in November, just starting to feel settled in. Doing physical therapy to fix my stubborn hamstring and shoulder. Watching GLOW season 2. Still lurking on this forum from time to time tongue

Lurkin' is good.

Not to pry, but what happened to these parts of you in the first place that makes them so stubborn now?

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Boter wrote:

New job is going well

OKAY WE HAVE ENOUGH EMPLOYED PEOPLE

Boter wrote:

New job is going well, worked yesterday on the 4th which was different as of late. Came in and they had a Pandora station of Souza going; I could listen to marches all day but some grumps changed it halfway through.

I'm with you on marches — they're slightly dorky-as-fuck, but god help me, I love 'em.

I don't think I recall knowing this: is the new job similar to the old job?

(Also — Ticonderoga ftfw, etc..)

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drewjmore wrote:

21st wedding anniversary today, big-family cousin's wedding this weekend. Procrastinating: the lawn, vehicle maintenance and my annual multi-cam dance recital edit.

[edit: clarify that the bride and groom are properly unrelated.]

I continue to be impressed by your home-life management. This guy has clearly figured something out.

(Referring here more to the twenty-one years and lovely daughters; less to the lawn and recital video.)

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Tomahawk wrote:

Fighting depression, working, working some more, gaming, and trying to find a girlfriend.

Yeah, apart from the job thing, I'm pretty much 13.

Oh, darn — I didn't realize you were single again. Sorry to hear that.

How's dating in 2018? Do you have to swipe everybody now?

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Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: Sup?

Teague wrote:

I don't think I recall knowing this: is the new job similar to the old job?

Not in the least. The job I'm referring to is as a bookseller at a local bookstore; we're hitting out 5th year anniversary for this location this summer, but the home store (and only other location) has been open for over 40.

So this hearkens back to my days selling video games. Certainly the particulars are different, and it's a much bigger operation than two part timers and the owner, but at its base: people are looking for books and I'm happy to sell them. Everyone has their own sections to manage and keep track of; I lucked into Sci-Fi (also includes Fantasy) and Graphic Novels, as well as some lower volume ones.

(We don't have name badges but lanyards make an easy identifier that you're an employee. I grabbed a button at the store and ordered a replica of an old Book It! button to keep with it.)

https://scontent-lga3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/47dde99e3315e944c1cac3da38643d2d/5BDECDD9/t51.2885-15/e35/35173451_1937357669629958_5839492171920572416_n.jpg

We do a lot of neat stuff, like a Staff Picks flyer in-store and online and recommendation tags on the shelves to highlight books the staff has enjoyed. Observe my almost exclusive attentions to sci-fi, including a book I was able to read in advance that's coming out next month (we get advance galleys to read, review, and be able to recommend in-store): https://www.northshire.com/picks/AndrewB

For reference, my old job was wedding videographer. I still shoot some weddings for the company but no longer edit. I'm also currently trying to do video on my own but it's been a bit slow, I need to refocus on trying to attract business.

Boter, formerly of TF.N as Boter and DarthArjuna. I like making movies and playing games, in one order or another.

Re: Sup?

Teague wrote:

Tell me of your jazz journey thus far. ('cuz I'm basically nowhere on jazz.)

Ha, that's funny, as one of the jazz artists in my library is only there because you used 'em for one of your hand-lettering videos (Mark Lewis Quartet).

Well, keep in mind that I know . . . literally nothing about the music theory involved in jazz. I played piano seriously for about eight years and have continued to do it on and off since then, so I have a pretty solid grounding in music theory, but modal jazz vs. chord-based jazz and that sorta thing . . . zip. Nada. So I'm probably a pretty bad appreciator of the genre, all things considered, in that I have next to no understanding of its technical basis. That said.

Started off with Miles Davis, which is in retrospect probably a bad move. Don't get me wrong—Miles Davis was an absolute fucking genius who reinvented his genre more times than any other 20th-century musician could lay claim to, and he made some really, really good music. But starting off with Kind of Blue with no context, which is exactly what I did, is like listening to Rubber Soul with no context as your first Beatles album (which is also exactly what I did). In both cases, you put the record on and listen to the music and go, "This is . . . nice, but what the hell am I missing?" And then you go straight to his electric period with Bitches Brew and zero context (see previous parenthetical statement), and get hit in the face with this abrasive cacophony that your mind just can't process (sorta like starting off Bob Dylan with Blonde on Blonde, which . . . see previous parenthetical statement again).

The Kind of Blue problem is that, taken entirely in a vacuum, that album is all sorts of pleasant to listen to but also way too easy to let fade into the background and become a passive listening experience. The Bitches Brew problem is that it's this dense mass of dissonance and echoes and sonic razors that is entirely unpleasant to the jazz newbie. Take those two extremes and you basically have the majority of what causes a problem with getting into jazz, based on my experience and lots of anecdotes.

All that long prologue to say: Miles Davis is great. Do not start with him. Or if you do, don't do Kind of Blue or Bitches Brew. (Do Round About Midnight or In a Silent Way.) Ditto John Coltrane. He is great. Do not start with A Love Supreme.

I got into music through Green Day, and my next great loves were The Who and The Beatles. It's been a long time since then, but obviously when those groups were my teenage self's musical basis I'm still gonna tend to lean toward music that has strong hooks and melodies. That's where Charlie Hunter comes in. He was recommended to me by a friend—he's a jazz guitarist who plays seven- and eight-stringed instruments so he can do both lead and bass lines at the same time. Insanely talented player. And because he can basically play two instruments at once, his records tend to be pretty sparse in their personnel. A lot of his more recent stuff is just him on lead guitar and "bass" and one of his friends on drums, with at most a horn player or two thrown in. That right there makes for a waaaaay more accessible starting point than a lot of classic jazz albums that have really dense sonic stuff going on. And his songs tend to be built around really catchy hooks—to present one example:

Not in any way to denigrate dense 20-minute long jam sessions, but . . . they're dense 20-minute long jam sessions. They're not how you grab new listeners. But a five-minute long, hooky song with some killer electric guitar that I can clearly hear doing its thing? You've got me interested.

All that longwindedness to say:

a.) Start with melodically based stuff. Gives your brain a foundation to work with.
b.) Start with comparatively stripped-down albums. Solo instruments, duos, trios, quartets within reason. No Bitches Brew, no Ascension, no The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady. Not yet. Stop it.

Once I'd gotten really into Charlie Hunter and went back to Miles' electric stuff, something just clicked. Not entirely, mind you—I still find his more meandering/abrasive material like Bitches Brew to be a challenge. But In a Silent Way and Jack Johnson as a next step from C.H. were perfect—they have more players and consist of long jams rather than tight little songs, but now I had the basis to extend my patience and get into them. The same process works for his earlier periods—once I went back to Miles' earlier 50s albums like Round About Midnight and Workin' with the Miles Davis Quintet, which have a lot of melodically driven standards on them, Kind of Blue was waaaay easier to grasp. I could see what he was doing differently there compared to his previous material, and because his more melodic stuff had trained me to actively listen I was able to get a better handle on what each individual musician was doing in material that on its surface can seem like nice quiet ambient music.

Anyway, that was all a really long way of imparting some very basic advice, especially since I'm still not very knowledgeable about the technical basis of jazz, but yeah. Start with melodic and/or stripped-down stuff, move on to the more-famous but less-accessible material once you have a solid basis for appreciating the artist. Don't try to force yourself to enjoy the milestone records immediately, it will only make things worse.

Some recommendations for starting out (this is presuming a lot about your familiarity/lack thereof with the genre, but fuck it, basically nowhere was the phrase tongue):

- Charlie Hunter, like I said. Gentlemen, I Neglected to Inform You You Will Not Be Getting Paid, Not Getting Behind Is the New Getting Ahead, and Everybody Has a Plan Until They Get Punched in the Mouth are all really good starting points.

- Charles Mingus. The gospel/blues-influenced stuff first, not The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady (which is this astonishing colossus of jazz crossed with Stravinsky but would have turned me waaaay off if I started with it). Do Mingus Ah Um, then Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus; before you do either in their entirety, listen to these two cuts off the latter. If the fire in them doesn't grab you I don't know what will.


- Vince Guaraldi. Yep, the Peanuts guy. Listen to this and tell me it isn't the prettiest thing you've ever heard.

- Bobby Timmons. This Here is Bobby Timmons has two or three of the catchiest jazz songs ever written on it. Seek out Cannonball Adderley and Art Blakey's versions of each respectively once you've heard Timmons's renditions.


Speakin' of . . .

- Cannonball Adderley. If you're a Fiddler on the Roof fan, his album of that musical's songs is an excellent gateway. You already have the melodic basis for the material grasped, so you can concentrate on what the musicians are doing differently with it.

- Art Blakey. Not too far in on him yet besides Moanin', I've gotta say, but "The Drum Thunder Suite" is basically just what it says on the tin and it's glorious.

- Dave Brubeck. Time Out is just a whole lot of fun and very accessible.

- Wes Montgomery. Just indescribably cool guitar work. Start with the full Smokin' at the Half Note.

- The Great Summit: The Master Tapes. Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong fool around for eighteen songs. Heaven.

For artists who are great but who definitely need the right starting point:

- Miles Davis. Like I said above, start with Round About Midnight and the early Miles Davis Quintet albums (Cookin', Workin', Relaxin', Steamin') for his 50s period, In a Silent Way and Jack Johnson for his electric period. Everything in between Bags' Groove and Agharta is worth listening to besides Quiet Nights. Make sure you're ready not to like Bitches Brew.

- John Coltrane. Blue Train, Crescent, and John Coltrane and Johnny Hartman are all good diving-in points. Don't start with A Love Supreme or, God help you, Ascension.

- Thelonious Monk. He's fantastic but his deliberately clunky piano playing can take some getting used to. Start with Monk's Dream, then Thelonious Monk with John Coltrane, then Thelonious Alone in San Francisco.

Oh, and AllMusic is an insanely useful resource just to get a quick overview of which albums by which artists have a critical consensus of being excellent; they don't always get it right, but for an overview of the high points in discographies they're a good way of separating the wheat from the chaff.

And there you have Graham's Half-Informed Primer on How He Got Into Jazz. I'm sure I'll be embarrassed by most of this in the morning. tongue

Last edited by DarthPraxus (2018-07-11 06:01:19)

Re: Sup?

Yeah, getting into jazz can be hard, just because there's so much variety, so it's hard to know where to direct people.  It's like trying to give 'rock' recommendations to someone unfamiliar with the genre.  Are we talking Chuck Berry, the Who, heavy metal, Canadian post-rock?

A lot really depends what sort of stuff you're into in other genres.  The albums that got me into Miles Davis were his collaborations with Gil Evans, particularly Miles Ahead and Sketches of Spain. Miles Ahead is more "song" oriented, and Gil Evans has a lot of really interesting arrangements, voicings, instrument combinations, etc. If you're into cool orchestrations that might be worth having a look. Sketches of Spain I find more soulful and abstract, which are plusses for me, but other people don't like it as much.  Graham is right though that Quiet Nights is for completists only. 

if you're looking for something just a little more out there than Miles Ahead, say you're a bit more into post-punk and want lyricism but with a bit of weird unexpectedness, I can definitely second the Charles Mingus recommendation. Again, I really like his albums with larger groups 'cause I'm into large ensemble arranging, so you might start with Let My Children Hear Music, but Graham's recommendation of Mingus x 5 is an excellent suggestion as well.

Funnily enough, the album Graham tells you to avoid, The Black Saint and the Sinner Lady, was the first album I heard of his and I completely loved it from the first second, even though it almost took my head off. It's not that it's atonal or anything. It's quite lyrical and passionate. The best way I've thought of to describe it is that, to me, it sounds like what it is: big band music written by someone with some quite serious mental health problems.  (He was actually institutionalized for a while in the late 60's/early 70's, iirc.)

The one person that maybe needs mentioning that I think Graham has left off (except insofar as he's a key component on Kind of Blue) is Bill Evans.  Again, it's possible that there's a context issue, as he became very widely imitated, and so it can seem kind of bland and wallpaper-y if you let it fade into the background.  However, his classic trio records with Paul Motian and the amazing Scott LaFaro (who tragically died in a car accident aged 25) are legendary for a reason.  Waltz for Debby I think would be the obvious starting place, but make sure that however you're listening you can hear the bass clearly.  The way that the piano and bass relate/interact is key.

For the next hour, everything in this post is strictly based on the available facts.

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Re: Sup?

Sup? I'm a supe. (had to.) It's going well (don't listen to Martin), although I'm kinda not counting my work hours. Girlfriend works at the same studio as a historian so we don't even have the other one waiting at home to motivate leaving the workplace... it's dangerous. But work is great, it's the balance I needed this year between making shots, helping people out, teaching (which I always thought I sucked at but apparently not), and bringing my two cents on other projects currently in development.

Home time, when there's some, is cool. We're growing vegetables, our cat is now completely free to explore the surroundings, after spending months inside because of his hurt paw, and our fear he wasn't ready. Dude waits for us on the front steps when we come home.

Plus, we found him a little sister to take care of. Bite-sized 2 month old kitten that grew up in our street. It's so cute I actually melted a bit, which can be explained by science. They haven't met yet, but it's a matter of days.

I've been getting back into composing music, alternating between Ableton Live + the absolutely mind-blowing VSTs by EastWest (35 euros a month; something like a terabyte of data available. Subscribe now.) and letting my fingers roam freely on my guitar. I'm currently immersed in viking music, Wardruna being a huge inspiration these past few weeks. I've been exploring its cyclic, one-chord, droning style. It's absolutely captivating, fitting my contemplative side.

Life's good. I could use being a little less anxious for no reason. I've been feeling a bit disconnected from the mountain, so I need to find time to get back to hiking. Suzie's been buying me lots of books written by reknown mountaineers from the 50s, and I'd like to try getting a bit closer to nature in its purest form... without, you know, dying. They died a lot back then. Still do.

By the way, Everest is a great film.

Last edited by Saniss (2018-07-11 10:47:46)

Sébastien Fraud
Facebook | Twitter | 500px
"We're gonna build a great green screen, and make the traditional matte painters pay for it"
Saniss for President 2016 - "Make VFX great again"

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Re: Sup?

Yo, Prax, that was super helpful. Thanks.

(Welles, too — thanks bruh.)

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: Sup?

Saniss wrote:

Sup? I'm a supe. (had to.) ...

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-rt7OjyPNTn8/VcTC8E1eCXI/AAAAAAAAkJQ/9KoEwmxgTBQ/s1600/tumblr_nlvdxuZmam1unzfz8o3_400.gif

(UTC-06:00) Central Time (US & Canada)

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Re: Sup?

What's up with me is a few things.

Mrs Writhyn is finishing up prerequisite courses before she jumps into her masters (master's? master? masters'?) degree, and working way more than she should be (her employers are...not good at hiring people). So, my main task these days is to keep the house running smoothly. I work a normal 40 hrs, so I basically do the shopping, cooking, and cleaning so she doesn't have to worry about that.

All this doesn't really leave a lot of time for my creative work, but I'm waaaaaaay cooler with that now that I have a finished project out there (I may have mentioned it once or twice), so I don't mind hibernating a little bit. Here and there I'll write some poetry, song, or craft something small, including the cool-as-hell eclipse lamp. Keeps my CREATE SOMETHING DAMMIT! brain at ease. People still mention having listened to THD here and there, which is nice, and lots of people keep recommending it to each other on Twitter and Reddit.

One or two thoughts I have on continuing getting stuff "out there" is to render THD into a prose serial, doing the reading myself as a sort of companion audiobook that would allow for the narrative to open up to the other characters (Temple, Ember, Station...) and world. It'd be way less production work than the audiodrama, but it's still enough work to be on hold for a while.
The other thing I'm pretty much already doing is setting up to offer eclipse lamps for sale. Already have a handful of orders, though I'm not really expecting too many. Just something for a little extra cash here and there.

Besides this, I'm trying to teach myself full-stack web programming, with the objective of changing careers into something that interests me and has the potential to earn a bit more cash. Same reason the Mrs is getting her next degree: we really really want to adopt kid(s) within the next few years, and that requires a nicer place to live.

That's what's up! Oh, finally, there's a big transition in my church's leadership as the pastor is starting a different ministry and the other pastor is taking over. He asked me to preach much more regularly, so that's gonna happen soon. Cool cool.

Witness me!

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Re: Sup?

Writhyn wrote:

(master's? master? masters'?)

WE DON'T NEED NO STINKIN' MASTERS

Writhyn wrote:

CREATE SOMETHING DAMMIT!

Amen brother. I need to abide by that rule more.

Last edited by Saniss (2018-07-12 10:04:13)

Sébastien Fraud
Facebook | Twitter | 500px
"We're gonna build a great green screen, and make the traditional matte painters pay for it"
Saniss for President 2016 - "Make VFX great again"

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Re: Sup?

Eclipse lamps, you say?

Also, if your church happens to both record and make-available sermons, hook us up with any you're proud of.

Teague Chrystie

I have a tendency to fix your typos.

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Re: Sup?

Teague you may have missed when I dropped this in the chat room a few days ago: https://photos.app.goo.gl/xN4fKA5jYHzVQS1a6

Eclipse Lamp v1, battery-powered, remote and/or timer operated.

v2 will be a much cleaner design, hopefully next week will see testing. If it goes smoothly, I've got a few people wanting to buy one off me smile

Witness me!

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Re: Sup?

Teague wrote:

Not to pry, but what happened to these parts of you in the first place that makes them so stubborn now?

Sportz.

I play in a flag football league with some friends. I tweaked my hamstring running out for a pass last Spring. Thought it would get better if I laid off it for a while, but… nope.

I tore my rotator cuff playing dodgeball with a bunch of children 3 years ago (I help out with my church’s youth group). Got surgery a year later and initial therapy didn’t quite do the trick.

So I’m back to working on both of them, hoping to be able to run and throw again. I’m 26 and my body is giving up on me );

You still messing around with programming/Arduino at all, Teague?

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Re: Sup?

Teague wrote:

Also, if your church happens to both record and make-available sermons, hook us up with any you're proud of.

+1!

We're going through a change at my church too. We just hired a full-time youth pastor, and after 9 years (*wipes brow*) on the leadership team I'll be stepping away from it in the coming months.

I'm gonna take some time to figure out where I want to go from here. I've been comfortably tied down to my church, my town, and my family for most of my life. I'm embarking on the slow process of loosening those ties so I can make bold life changes, challenge myself, and hopefully grow as a person. So, that's what else is going on with me.

And software development is the bee's knees, a very fun and fulfilling job. Highly recommended.

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Re: Sup?

Finishing up my software development degree this August. Feeling overwhelmed...driving Uber.

--
One Time @ Bland Camp...

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