<sniffs, tastes>
That's a fucking "Milky Way."
Ya' limey fruits got your planets and galaxies all inside-out.

http://media.thehoopdoctors.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/mars-blackmon-rt-float-1.jpg

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(46 replies, posted in Episodes)

*pneumatic

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(429 replies, posted in Off Topic)

Hello Michael, we look forward to your contributions.  wink

What kind of compositing are you into these days?

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(249 replies, posted in Off Topic)

Dorkman, Fuck Yeah!

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(18 replies, posted in Off Topic)

Affirmative.

7

(10 replies, posted in Creations)

Yep, you're one of my favorite, "I know a guy who..." stories for that one! ;-)

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(10 replies, posted in Creations)

I remember doing the prison-establishing shots for that.
Where the hell's my money?

9

(592 replies, posted in Creations)

Solid work.

Hey Teague, is the Radiopunk address accessible to members only?
Mind if I link Dale Daugherty to it?

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(101 replies, posted in Off Topic)

Tomahawk wrote:

I may or may not have misread a single word in there. Move along, or I'll kiss your asses too.

The reply is acceptable; the tale told worthy indeed. ;-)

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(101 replies, posted in Off Topic)

First, I must acknowledge the appearance of Dave! Surviving fatherhood alright?

First night out with friends that made you feel older than you were.

Not sure that I will personally ever feel old, but then I've always been mature for my age.

I got married not long after college, none of my friends at that time were even seriously dating anyone. I tried to hang on to the old social connections, but it quickly devolved into having no value for me. At a certain level, and this is probably sexist at the core, a major purpose of the college social life is to hook up and move on. Getting married is one way to shift phases.

Keeping the story short: my college crew were getting back together to hit a club in the city, and all that that implies. My wife was at a weekend continuing education class someplace, leaving me a born again bachelor for the evening. Watching the veritable "Night at the Roxbury" that ensued made me pity my boys, and appreciate my wedded bliss all the more.



Q: Describe the most superlative moment of ass-kissing you've experienced, perpetrated or witnessed.

This is the best thing I will consume this week.

Writhyn wrote:

The Force Awakened and moved him to compassion

Believe it or not, I like this one ^ the best.

@Squig & DarthP, I guess from an in-film perspective it is handled just fine. We see him struggle in the village, we get that he's about to get busted by Phasma, he quits. However, and this was my thought on the first-watch, how does this guy ever get into a squad? If the FO is really as ruthless as we are led to believe, Finn should have been executed in the field for cowardice.

Anyhoo, in the spirit of curiosity and fair-shake giving, I bought Greg Rucka's "Before the Awakening." The Finn backstory in there tells us that he is a highly successful (the best in his class, even) cadet, but his 'flaw' is that he cares about his fellow cadets, and presumably people in general. He gets reprimanded //by Phasma// repeatedly for not being ruthless enough, for helping his fellow cadets when they are weak. What is never addressed is how someone raised from infancy in that culture can't deal with it, and rebels against it...or why he was still allowed to be a part of it.

Does this foreshadow some great expository flashback or fireside confession in upcoming episodes? What is in his past that made him want to be 'good'? Why was he not happy like the other stormtroopers? That is what I'm dying to know. A writer someplace spitballed the character: a stormtrooper who changes sides. I want to know how they justified the backstory that leads to that, such that it's more than that superficial whim.

Got a heavily spoken-over re-watch this past weekend courtesty of Amazon streaming. The friends on my couch discussed and opined over the whole running time, but we never were able to nail down (or ret-con) how a stormtrooper could suddenly decide to, "do the right thing." What have you guys got for that?

<--- Really digs Teague's writing style and sense of humor.

Bra fucking vo, sir.
I've been silently watching your progress on this lil' fellah in the chat.

I'm on the board of our local Makerspace(tm), (and setting up a Maker Faire in late August [/implied rejectionphobic invitation]). Once the electronics website guys are done with this, I bet we could get you into MAKE magazine.

That fight immediately had me planning an extravagant scene where saplings are being sliced with every swing. Then they started doing that on screen.

Good stuff up there Owen, thanks!

How many callbacks to the other movies can we list?

Fin has a brief moment with the ANH training drone while trying to fix the Falcon.
Han quips to Fin (the former Starkiller Station janitor) about trash compactors.
Kylo Ren was originally named "Ben," presumably after Kenobi (pretty sure this was an EU fact as well, and callback might not be the right term...)
Maz' <fixed> bungalow looks like Jabba's Palace and the Cantina begat a Disney-themed love-child.

I know I'm forgetting a bunch.

Rey's got abandonment issues: the tally marks on her wall, the vision after touching the lightsaber, and so much hugs when Fin actually came back for her.

I may be way out of line here, but didn't the dialog mostly concern Fin and Rey introducing themselves to  people? Especially early in the thing, every word felt like an exposition dump. "The Falcon was stolen from whoever and sold to that other guy and then borrowed by Whathisnuts." I get it, there is a history here.

Apart from that, the visual story and action won me over when the kids blasted that second TIE fighter on Jakku, and the tentacle creatures are my favorite monsters yet. I did not retain their species name, in spite of the triple repetition... started with an R did it?

Fight choreo was superb, IMO. Untrained in style, even down to a few unnecessary twirl-flourished from Kylo Ren...just like we all do when there's nothing better to do while holding a lightsaber/stick. Lots of brutal non-lethal touches, even a chopped off hand!

Dudes. I have seen it.

Ryan and Brandon share the screen again.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/29628015/20151217_220256.jpg

7 hours 30minutes and counting down...

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(538 replies, posted in Creations)

Zarban wrote:

Any movement on this lately by chance?

Not at my end.
Too many excuses to list.

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(7 replies, posted in Movie Stuff)

It was a bit odd that this was not simply live-action, I would only note that the scenes set in Limbo would have been a VFX challenge back then. Not to mention the scenes of the villain's mayhem and destruction.

I'll agree that Cusack doesn't pass the, "What does Brad Pitt sound like?" test, but neither does Meg Ryan. As it relates to the animated vs. live topic, perhaps the realistic human characters just needed realistic human voices? If it had been live, I'd call it perfect casting to their types. Also, these names are big enough to signal adult ticket buyers that this was not some shabby production.

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(7 replies, posted in Movie Stuff)

Previously established: I am a teen-aged girl, who conveniently fathered two daughters. Last night we had some time to kill, since school is out today and tomorrow for something or other, so we surfed around on the Netflix and settled on...

Anastasia (1997)
Meg Ryan, John Cusack, Kelsey Grammar (Russian accent mode) and Christopher Lloyd as the evil sorcerer Rasputin. Supported by Angela Lansbury and Bernadette Peters. Hank Azaria brings the comic relief familiar to life.

I could stop here and demand that you all watch it now, 'cuz, Dayum! Dat cast.  Having missed or glossed over the credits, I had a good time in my way by guessing the actors from their voices.

It's a modern musical (I could also stop here...), based on a play and follow-on film from the mid-50's.
Neither Ryan nor Cusack sings, their lyrics are handled by stalwarts.

Technically interesting is the use of infant CGI to bring sweeping camera moves and architecture to life in this mostly hand-animated little film.

The historical setup is dubious at best, but then this is a what-if tale about the Tsar's daughter avoiding the bloody parts of the Russian Revolution, immortalized in the Rolling Stones' "Sympathy for the Devil," and elsewhere. We get past that pretty quickly and then it's a road adventure as our heroes meet and subsequently undertake a journey from St. Petersburg to Paris.

The girl has suffered from amnesia since age 8. The men have auditioned countless actresses to play the part of the long lost Duchess Anastasia in a simple scam to win the 10 million Ruble prize for finding her. This contrived mistaken identity is a bit of a hole in the plot, but it is discussed at length and thus festooned with lanterns.

As she is the last of the Romanovs he cursed, the undead Rasputin's soul cannot rest until Anastasia is no more. So like a wicked Oz witch he employs vaporous minions to cause various calamities for the resourceful crew to narrowly escape.

Once in Paris, her grandmother is simply fed up and finished with interviewing pretenders and charlatans, and must be manipulated to even grant an audience to the progressively lovelier Ana.

The film's climax brought tears and cheers from our audience, and I'd say the IMDB 7.1 rating is unfairly low. I skipped it in the 90's, but I'm glad I finally came around.

8.5/10